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The low-salt diet is a big, fat lie!

I’d rather drop dead early than live to the age of 100 gnawing on low-salt soy nuggets.

That wouldn’t be a long life.

It would be a PUNISHMENT!

Fortunately, you don’t have to sentence yourself to joyless, life-sapping, low-salt meals to live longer and healthier.

You can live better than ever, as new research CONFIRMS that the most common meal-ruining advice of all is full of… well… let’s just say it’s full of tofu.

You’ve heard it a million times: Cut your sodium intake.

Remove the salt, and your blood pressure levels are supposed to drop. Maybe you’ve tried it. Maybe you’ve tried it and found it didn’t do squat — and if that’s the case, the new study finds you’re hardly alone.

This wasn’t some piddling short-term study that looked at day-to-day levels of salt and BP. It followed THOUSANDS of men and women from their 30s into the 60s for DECADES.

They found that over 20 or even 30 years, folks with salt intake below 2,500 mg per day DIDN’T have lower blood pressure.

It was HIGHER!

More importantly, these poor saps following mainstream medical advice — eating bland low-sodium dinners because they were positively terrified of what would happen if they sprinkled a little salt on their food — didn’t have a lower risk of heart disease, either.

The research team behind the new study says the current average sodium intake for most Americans of between 3,000 mg and 3,500 mg per day — more than DOUBLE what the American Heart Association is pushing on most folks — is perfectly fine, especially if you’re getting those other nutrients.

That’s in line with other studies. One even found that cutting your levels below 3,000 mg per day is actually every bit as bad for you as super high sodium levels of 7,000 mg per day.

If you need to bring your BP levels down, forget salt. The answer, according to the new study, is potassium. As your levels rise, your BP will drop — especially if you increase your magnesium and calcium along with it.

So, if your doc has been pushing the low-sodium advice, he owes you an apology.

I doubt you’ll get one.

But you CAN apologize to your taste buds. Rescue the salt shaker from whatever dark corner it’s been banished to, and bring it back to the center of your dinner table.

Yes, it IS possible to get too much salt — if you’re eating processed foods (especially sauces, dressings, and flavorings).

But if you cook your food fresh and add salt to taste, you’ll enjoy both good meals and even better health.

Health Disclaimer: The information provided on this site should not be construed as personal medical advice or instruction. No action should be taken based solely on the contents of this site. Readers should consult appropriate health professionals on any matter relating to their health and well-being.


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