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The REAL story behind the medical martyr accused of murder

The REAL story behind the medical martyr accused of murder

If you’ve been a reader of mine for a while, you’ve heard me singing the praises of intravenous hydrogen peroxide (H202) therapy for the treatment of all kinds of illnesses. I’m not just paying it lip service because it’s an “alternative” treatment, either-I’ve used the therapy myself hundreds of times to treat desperate patients in Africa and other locales. It really is miraculous.

Yet not surprisingly, the mainstream has COMPLETELY IGNORED this incredible, safe, and low-cost healer. Until now.

Recently, hydrogen peroxide therapy has hit the headlines in a big way-and not for being the miracle-cure it is, but for supposedly killing a Minnesota woman. As absurd as this notion should be to anyone with even the most rudimentary medical knowledge, what’s even more absurd is this:

The licensed physician who administered the therapy is being charged by the state’s coroner with murder-not malpractice, like what typically occurs with thousands of drug-related deaths mainstream M.D.s cause every year, but MURDER. I hope you’re sitting down, because the shocking story of this innocent doc’s persecution would knock anyone off their feet in outrage. Here’s the “Reader’s Digest” version:

Murder or misunderstanding?

According to The New York Times and countless other cookie-cutter articles in newspapers across the country-along with that paragon of journalistic “virtue,” CBS’s 60 Minutes (home of the disgraced Dan Rather)-South Carolina physician James Shortt, M.D., is being sued in civil court for the so-called “murder” of Katherine Bibeau, a Minnesota woman who sought out the doctor for an alternative treatment for her critical-stage multiple sclerosis.

Tragically, five days following Shortt’s administration of intravenous H202 Mrs. Bibeau died. The cause? According to the coroner and pathologists behind the murder charge, the hydrogen peroxide caused bubbles in the bloodstream, which ultimately caused cardiac arrest and multiple organ failure.

But as I mentioned before, this notion is utterly IMPOSSIBLE.

Bursting the bubble theory

The idea that an injection of diluted hydrogen peroxide caused the death of anyone five days after administration is a joke-and I’m not the only one who knows it. R.J. Rowen, M.D., President of the International Oxidative Medicine Association, summed it up in a statement responding to the ludicrous lawsuit and charges currently being leveled against Dr. Shortt. Here, in part, is his explanation:“

The roughly half-teaspoon of peroxide the doctor uses will release about 25cc of oxygen. And since it is administered through an IV, it doesn’t go in all at once but over the course of two hours. In order to kill someone it takes 300cc of air administered instantly. At most, Mrs. Bibeau received only 25cc of oxygen. So even if Dr. Shortt had administered it instantly, it still would have been less than 10 percent of the amount needed to kill her

The pathologist claims that he found bubbles in Mrs. Bibeau’s bloodstream. Could those bubbles possibly come from the hydrogen peroxide therapy? Of course not! Any pre-med student will tell you oxygen is consumed so quickly, it’s impossible any bubbles would have lasted all that time. Even if she were given gallons of oxygen fast enough to kill her instantly, her body would have continued absorbing it, even after death. You see, cells remain active and continue using oxygen long after the heart stops.

But only 25 cc of oxygen, four days before and given during a two-hour IV? Your body burns that much oxygen in mere seconds! Oxygen in these amounts simply can’t kill someone. And doctors who administer hydrogen peroxide therapy have known this for decades.”

Two other factors conveniently “forgotten”

As you can see, something’s amiss with both the coroner’s report and the mainstream media’s reporting on this landmark witch hunt. Beyond simply the shameless crucifixion of a noble-minded, progressive American healer, there’s an even darker underbelly to this story-one that involves a mainstream cover-up of mammoth proportions.

Nevertheless, the proceedings against Dr. Shortt march forward, especially in the court of public opinion-with credibility-challenged CBS leading the charge. The 60 Minutes segment on the story conveniently omitted or glossed over what most likely killed this poor woman instead of harmless, beneficial H202.

Prescription drugs.

Let me refer again to the statement issued in response to this absurd witch-hunt by Dr. Rowen:

“The coroner’s report said (Mrs. Bibeau) was taking the drugs Tegretol and Copaxone. Look these drugs up…You’ll find that they cause a variety of side effects including ecchymosis (bruising), infection, bleeding, thrombosis, and liver damage. These are the exact symptoms found in Mrs. Bibeau when she arrived at the hospital. That fact alone should force the pathologist to look first at the drugs as a primary cause of this woman’s death, not peroxide.

“Apparently, this possibility never occurred to the “journalists” at 60 Minutes. An innocent oversight, I’m sure. It couldn’t possibly have to do with the fact that television networks bank $3 BILLION a year from drug ads, could it?

The more you know, the less you have to fear

It’s no secret that Big Pharma spends a lot of dough on slick, prime-time ads for its poisons. But the real question is this: How many journalistic favors are they buying with this money? Now, I know what you’re thinking: They came down pretty hard on Vioxx, didn’t they?

Nope-not compared to the body count. Even conservative sources put the death toll from the “Killer V” at 50,000-that’s more than 30 times the number of America’s brave servicemen and women who’ve died so far in the Iraq war. But has chemical weapon Vioxx gotten 30 times the press? No way. Clearly, the media has reported on the scandal only enough to maintain the appearance of credibility.

In fact, I’d be willing to bet that in the end, this one story about the “dangers” of hydrogen peroxide will have gotten more press coverage than Vioxx, Celebrex, and all the other Cox-2 killers combined. Perhaps the most ironic example of this is the fact that drug promos monopolize the advertising time on the 60 Minutes show itself. According to consumer advocate Tim Bolen (of Quackpot Watch e-newsletter fame), three of the six commercials leading into the segment on Dr. Shortt were from the major pharmaceuticals makers.

It’s a double-whammy. The ads position drugs as the be-all and end-all of medical heroism while the “news” horrifies you into shying away from the safest (not to mention cheapest) and most lifesaving alternative therapies out there. What a racket!

Let’s face it, the drug makers are a formidable foe. They’ve got deep pockets, and the media’s in them. All we have on our side is the truth. But that truth doesn’t do any good if no one ever discovers it. So I’m offering a free electronic copy of my book on hydrogen peroxide therapy, Hydrogen Peroxide, Medical Miracle, to anyone who visits the following link within the next 30 days: www.h2o2medicalmiracle.com. No strings, no catch, just a free education on this miraculous therapy. Or you can buy a hard copy for $7 from www.drdouglass.com. (It’s normally a $20 book.) Get a copy for yourself, then pass this article to anyone you think might find the information valuable.

In exchange for this free copy of Hydrogen Peroxide, Medical Miracle, I ask only one thing: That you consider making a contribution to Dr. Shortt’s defense fund at Free Choice Legal Defense Fund, c/o Transfer Point, 1073 Statler Rd., Columbia, SC 29210.

Please support Dr. Shortt in every way that you can-we must win this case.

References:

“Hydrogen peroxide doesn’t kill patients, drugs do!” Second Opinion Newsletter (www.secondopinion.com), accessed 3/8/05

“Air Embolism during Insertion of Central Venous Catheters.” J Vasc Interv Radiol, 2001; 12(11): 1,291-1,295

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